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‘No one knows your journey better than you. Be proud of you’ – International Women’s Day and what it means to the people of North Yorkshire Police

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International Women's Day, which is celebrated on 8 March each year, is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day, which has occurred for well over a century, also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

The role of women in the police service has evolved significantly in the country in last 100 years. The Women’s Police Service was founded in 1914 and a year later, the first female officer was given the power to arrest. By 1920, 43 police authorities in England and Wales were employing 238 women.

It was 1946 when police women were first introduced to North Riding Constabulary, the forerunner to North Yorkshire Police. In September 1950 WPC 12 Joan Moore became the first police woman to be promoted to Sergeant where she was duly posted to Headquarters to supervise the 13 female officers in the force.

By the mid-1970s, female officers in North Yorkshire were given parity on pay and their range of duties was expanded. Around this time, the Women’s Police department was also disbanded resulting in all officers being integrated into a single force.

The appointment in 2002 of Della Cannings to Chief Constable marked a new chapter in the history of North Yorkshire Police as the first woman police officer to take over the helm of the force. In fact, she was only the fifth woman nationally to be selected for this high-level and demanding role.

The force now has 488 serving female police officers and 928 female staff, volunteers and Special Constables, supporting Chief Constable Lisa Winward, the second woman to hold that position for North Yorkshire Police.

To celebrate International Women’s Day we have asked some of the incredible women, men and volunteers who work both on the front line and behind-the-scenes at North Yorkshire Police to tell us about their proudest moment and what the day means to them. Here’s what they have to say:

 

IT IS A CHANCE TO SHOUT ABOUT HOW STRONG, INDEPENDENT AND WORTHY WE ALL ARE

Ruth Pearson is a Police Community Support Officer currently based in Skipton. She joined policing in 2005 because she wanted a job that wasn’t ‘office based’, would be different every day and where she could genuinely make a difference to people.

Over the years I’ve had a lot of proud moments but the one that stands out was being part of the team involved in a recent murder case. Although the event itself was harrowing and tragic for all involved, the way the police team came together to get the right result for the family was immense. I was proud to be a small part of that team.

There are lots of elements about working for North Yorkshire Police that I could choose to be my favourite, one being the stunning scenery and one being the people. However for me it is having the ability to make someone’s life that bit easier, to offer someone those few words of reassurance that means they feel safe in their own home.

I think International Women’s Day is a fantastic opportunity to showcase the work that women do, in whatever role they have. It is a chance to shout about how strong, independent and worthy we all are.

PCSO Ruth Pearson (pictured) was proud to be part of a small team that came together to get the right result for the family of a murder victim in the town 

 

I AM PROUD EVERY TIME I TELL SOMEONE THAT I WORK FOR NORTH YORKSHIRE POLICE

Gabby Rudge-Cox works in the Force Control Room as Communications Officer. She joined in 2016 because she wanted to have a job that she was proud of and enjoyed getting up to go to.

I joined North Yorkshire Police because I wanted to work in an exciting and dynamic environment where what I do makes a difference to people in circumstances of real crisis and need, people who are vulnerable and who don’t have the best impression of the police.

I have been proud many times in this role and for a wide variety of reasons. One moment would have to be receiving a 999 call from a five year-old boy who’s grandad wouldn’t wake up but I was able to work out who and where they were and got help to them quickly. I am just as proud when I receive a call from an elderly person who doesn’t know where else to turn with a problem and I am able to solve it for them, or I could be the first person who speaks to someone who has been sexually abused and has summoned up the courage to report it.

Every day is different, every call is different, and you get as much out of the job as you put in. I find its constantly changing and that keeps it interesting. I am proud every time I tell someone that I work for North Yorkshire Police and the role I do. To have a member of the public I have helped write or call in to give their thanks is one of the best feelings imaginable.

International Women’s Day is a really important opportunity to celebrate how far equality has come over the decades, but also to acknowledge that we are not all the way there yet. There is still room for improvement throughout the world and anything that promotes and empowers women in the work place, especially in a previously male focused establishment, is fantastic.

FCR Communications Officer Gabby Rudge-Cox (pictured) said that having a member of the public she has helped get in touch to give their thanks is one of the best feelings imaginable

 

I WOULD NEVER WANT MY DAUGHTER TO FEEL RESTRICTED IN HER CAREER IN ANY WAY

Johnathon Reardon joined the Talent and Resourcing team in 2016 because he wanted to enhance the recruitment experience for candidates joining the force and make sure the best, brightest and most talented people were recruited to take the organisation forward.

My proudest moment was when our team was nominated for a national recruitment awards, coming runner-up for “candidate experience”. My favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is the variety of work I get involved in. Whether this is supporting candidates through our process, delivering presentations, participating in Inclusion & Diversity meetings and Positive Action events, or catching up with candidates once they start with us and seeing them progress in their career.

I think International Women’s Day is incredibly important to celebrate, but also acknowledge that there is still work to be done on many fronts. It is crazy to think that it has taken until recent times for many organisations to appoint their first ever female CEO, including Revlon, Air France, Cancer Research, yet only 5% of all Fortune 500 companies have a female CEO.

When I think about my own daughter growing up and making sense of the world, she will start to consider career choices and I would never want her to feel restricted in any way. So I guess we all have a part to play to change this dynamic and promote female role models, particularly in business, as North Yorkshire Police is doing.

Talent Acquisition Advisor Johnathon Reardon (pictured) believes that there is still work to be done on many fronts.

 

NO ONE KNOWS YOUR JOURNEY BETTER THAN YOU. BE PROUD OF YOU

Sandy Scott works as a Response Sergeant in York. She is one for the force’s LGBTQ Network Deputy Co-Chairs and also Co-chair of the National Bi-Visibility working group.

I joined the police in 2006 in the Force Control Room as police staff before going on to join as a police officer in 2009. Sounds cliché, but like most people I think I wanted to make a difference. When I was younger I had reason to contact the police about a personal matter and was seriously let down. From then on I wanted to join so that I could be the officer that I so desperately needed back then.

My proudest moment was when I was attested. It was the culmination of around 15 years of dreaming, wanting and working towards this moment, and overcoming many mental barriers in the process. My favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is my team. They are an amazing group of officers who are all wonderfully individual and work well together to get the results they do. Every day is a school day and not a day goes by when I don’t learn something new and valuable from them. In this job we never stop learning and asking questions and each day is unique with its own challenges. We have an opportunity every day to have a positive impact upon people’s lives. That is a real privilege.

I think International Women’s Day is a time to recognise and celebrate women of all backgrounds who, either prominently or hidden in the shadows, have helped to change things for the better. Those who stand up to be role models for tomorrow’s generation and work hard in their arena whether that be sport, music, literature or supporting minority communities towards equality. I especially want to give a mention to our trans women who face countless challenges in their daily lives and are currently suffering so much persecution along with the rest of the trans community, from not only the media but also their peers and often their families too.

For me it is also a time to reflect upon our own journeys and feel a sense of pride in what we have achieved no matter how small and insignificant it may seem to others, and to thank those who have stood by us and supported us. No one knows your journey better than you to understand the effort, both mental and physical that it’s taken to get where you are today. Be proud of you.

Sergeant Sandy Scott (pictured) joined policing because she wanted to be the officer that she desperately needed when she was younger

 

I HOPE TO REACH OUT TO THOSE PEOPLE THROUGH MY NEW ROLE

PC Uzma Amireddy joined North Yorkshire Police as a Positive Action Coordinator at the end of 2018 with a remit to develop the Positive Action programme across the force.

I’ve always been passionate about policing, and about making a difference in whatever I do. I became a Police Constable in 2012 in Cleveland Police for that very reason. I also wanted a challenging career that allowed me to serve my community, especially those who are discriminated against because of who they are – I hope to be able to reach out to those people through my new role.

My proudest moment was when I became a mother to my beautiful daughter followed by my beautiful twins. My personal experiences as a Muslim Asian woman officer with a young family have made me a passionate advocate of equal opportunities, career progression and fair treatment in the workplace for all. I think International Women’s Day is a fantastic day which not only recognises women’s achievements but also serves as a reminder how important it is to continuously strive for a fair and equal world.

Some people have great potential, but for various different reasons they’ve never thought about policing as a career option. I hope our celebration of International Women’s Day helps those people see that it is a great job, with huge variety, and you can climb the ladder.  I’m proud to be part of the policing family and be given the challenge of promoting North Yorkshire Police’s Positive Action Programme to the next level.

PC Uzma Amireddy’s (pictured) proudest moment was becoming a mother to her three children

 

I AM CONTINUALLY INSPIRED BY OTHERS AROUND ME

Assistant Chief Constable Amanda Oliver joined policing in 1990 because she wanted to make a difference to people’s lives. She transferred to North Yorkshire Police as a Superintendent in 2009 and became Assistant Chief Constable in 2017.

My proudest moment was when I joined the police as a constable. Everything else in terms of the incidents I have dealt with, the difference I feel I have made and the varied and interesting career I have had has been an absolute bonus.

North Yorkshire Police really does feel like a family force, I am truly supported by my colleagues and the team around me do a fantastic job, day in and day out. I think International Women’s Day is a really good opportunity to take a moment to reflect and celebrate the continued success of women all over the world.

Personally I feel really blessed to have been able to be a mum to my two children whilst at the same time being able to have a really fulfilling, exciting and rewarding career. I am continually inspired by others around me and am aware that not all women, either in this country or internationally have the same opportunities that I have had and hopefully the day can be used to both celebrate success and continue to make a difference for women and girls across the globe.

Assistant Chief Constable Amanda Oliver (pictured) feels blessed to have been able to be a mum to her two children whilst at the same time being able to have a fulfilling, exciting and rewarding career.

 

EVERYONE SHOULD BE TREATED FAIRLY AND WITH RESPECT REGARDLESS OF THEIR GENDER

Tom Stirling works as both a Corporate Communications Manager and volunteers as a Special Constable for the force.

I joined North Yorkshire Police in the Corporate Communications team in 2009 and since 2012 I have also volunteered as a Special Constable. Both roles are extremely rewarding, as they help me make a real, tangible difference to my community – keeping vulnerable people safe, reassuring the public, and thwarting criminals.

I strongly believe everyone should be treated fairly and with respect, regardless of their gender. Sadly, this isn’t always the case, which is why awareness-raising initiatives such as International Women’s Day are so important.

One of the first jobs I attended as a Special involved taking a statement from a woman who had been threatened by a man with an axe. Her fear and vulnerability made a big impact on me, and incidents like that are a stark reminder of the importance of the police in ensuring all victims are safeguarded and given whatever support they need.

Corporate Communications Manager Tom Stirling (pictured) enjoys being able to keep vulnerable people safe, reassuring the public, and thwarting criminals in both his full-time and volunteer roles

 

I’M MASSIVELY PROUD TO SEE THE WORK BEING DONE TO BUILD AN EVER MORE DIVERSE WORKFORCE

Temporary Assistant Chief Constable Ciaron Irvine joined North Yorkshire Police in 2018 with the specific responsibility for local policing.  He joined the police service in 1994, serving for 24 years in Cleveland Police to help those people who are often unable to look after or keep themselves safe.

My proudest individual moment on a professional level was becoming a Chief Inspector just before my father died and knowing how proud he was in my achievements in the service.  Since then I have been part of many great moments, including seeing Cleveland Police recruit a cohort of student officers with a 50/50 male to female membership and thinking that this is how the service should be moving forward.

As a relatively new member of North Yorkshire Police I am hugely impressed by the friendliness and public service ethos across the organisation and massively proud to see the work being done to build an ever more diverse workforce.

International Women’s Day is a key date in the calendar to showcase the talents and achievements in a variety of environments and also to shine a spotlight on the work that still needs to be done to support women in the workplace and beyond to flourish and fully achieve their potential.

Temporary Assistant Chief Constable Ciaron Irvine (pictured) was proud to see his previous police force achieve a 50/50 male to female membership of student officers

 

STRIVE, NOT TO BE A SUCCESS, BUT RATHER TO BE OF VALUE

Sergeant Zoe Billings works in the Partnership Hub and joined in 2006 as a regular following being a Special Constable whilst she studied for her PhD.

Joining the police was a huge career change but I did so because I felt passionately about public service and wanted to be able to genuinely make a positive difference.  I’m an altruist; one of my favourite quotes that I stand by is Einstein’s “Strive, not to be a success, but rather to be of value”.

My proudest moment, well, I could pick from receiving the Tarquin Trophy for the work I do with the British Horse Society improving rider safety on the roads of North Yorkshire, commendations received for my work in fatal collision investigation or good results at court from investigations I have led, but really I feel a huge sense of pride from wearing the uniform on days when I know I have made a difference. Actually, a lovely widow from a fatal collision I led the investigation into said had it not been for me, she likely wouldn’t be here today. That makes my eyes leak; I’m humbled and honoured by her kind words. To have impacted positively on someone’s life during such a traumatic time, that means more to me than any award or commendation – although I am very grateful for them!

My favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is having the autonomy to use my diversity of thought to bring a different viewpoint and make a difference. The ability to develop ideas and people never fails to excite me. I think International Women’s Day is a great opportunity to recognise the huge range of skills and qualities women bring to the workplace and the inspiration they can be to others.

Sergeant Zoe Billings Sergeant Zoe Billings (pictured) said that to have impacted positively on someone’s life during such a traumatic time means more to me than any award or commendation

 

 

WE SHOULD MAXIMISE THE POTENTIAL OF EACH AND EVERY ONE OF US, NO MATTER WHO WE ARE

Superintendent Mark Khan is lead in force for Hate Crime and joined policing in 1994.

As a man who is a father of a daughter and works with a number of female colleagues on a daily basis, I feel very strongly about making sure they are treated fairly and have the same opportunities as me. I recognise that because of their gender women often don’t have the same prospects as me and may not enjoy the same equality as me. This is something I really want to change which is why I think International Women’s Day is such an important date in the calendar.

I joined policing in 1994 because I wanted to make a difference, and as a senior manager and lead in force for Hate Crime for North Yorkshire Police, I have a responsibility and chance to make that difference by ensuring that every person in the workforce has equal opportunities no matter who they are – something I’m really proud to be part of.

For us, International Women’s Day is a chance to celebrate the many incredible women, and men, who help make a difference every day in North Yorkshire. It also seeks as a reminder that we should maximise the potential of each and every one of us, no matter who we are, to create a better world where we are all seen as people regardless of our gender, race, religion, disability or sexual orientation.

Superintendent Mark Khan (pictured) is proud to be making a difference by ensuring that every person in the workforce has equal opportunities no matter who they are

 

IT’S A PRIVILEGE TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE EVERY SINGLE DAY

Chief Constable Lisa Winward started her police career in North Yorkshire Police in 1993 as a Special Constable in York. She joined Humberside Police as a regular officer in 1994 and worked through to the ranks before transferring back to North Yorkshire police in 2008 as Chief Inspector. She was appointed at Chief Constable in August 2018.

I joined policing as a Special Constable because I wanted to help people stay safe, to create a better society for everyone and to stop people harming others. It’s a privilege to have the opportunity to make a difference to people, both inside and outside the organisation every single day.

I have had many proud moments during my career, mostly when I have been able to change someone’s life for the better in some way. One of the proudest moments was attending the Lifestyle Awards where young people have worked in the community alongside our neighbourhood teams to make the local area a better place in some way and having the chance to meet them and recognise their efforts.

I think International Women’s Day is a great opportunity to celebrate and share the wonderful work of women in society and the diverse skills they bring to complement those around them.

Chief Constable Lisa Winward (pictured) said one of her proudest moments was meeting some young people who had received an award for helping to improve their local area

 

I’M PROUD TO SAY THAT I AM IN THE FORCE

Inspector Denise Wond works in the Proactive Policing team in North Yorkshire Police. She joined policing because she liked the idea of catching criminals and helping victims, which hasn’t changed.

I originally joined in 1986 and then re-joined in 2003 after seven years out with my children; there aren’t many jobs where you can have such diversity of roles in one employment. My proudest moment was when I was presented with a Judge’s Commendation from my family liaison role and my family came to the ceremony.

My favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is that most of the public appreciate what we do and I’m proud to say that I am in the force. I think International Women’s Day is an opportunity to celebrate how far we’ve come since I joined the police.

Inspector Denise Wond (pictured) believes that there aren’t many jobs where you can have such diversity of roles in one employment

 

I JUGGLE A PAID ROLE, VOLUNTARY ROLE AND FAMILY LIFE

Jemma Kettlestring joined North Yorkshire Police in 2006 as a Special Constable. Three months after joining she also became a Communications Controller in the Force Control Room.

I joined after completing a degree in Police and Criminal Investigation and 13 years later I am still doing both roles but I am now a Special Sergeant for the York City and East team. The best thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is being an initial point of contact for the public to assist them when they are in an emergency situation; also engaging with the public at community events and representing the force.

My proudest moments as a Controller was when I received an award for a call I took in which a male was lost in the snow and also receiving a commendation for an incident I was involved in where a male was claiming to have a bomb in his bag. My proudest moment for my Specials role was when I received my long service medal and also representing North Yorkshire Police in the York Remembrance Day parades.

I juggle a paid role, voluntary role and family life which can be a challenge to achieve an equal balance between my career and family life. I think International Women’s Day is important as it highlights the achievements of women and the importance of women in roles all around the world.

Communications Controller Jemma Kettlestring (pictured) has many proud moments in both her role in the Force Control Room and as a Special Sergeant.

 

BEING THROWN OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE IS WHERE TRUE GROWTH HAPPENS

Chief Inspector Rachel Wood is the Operations Commander for the City of York and Selby. She joined North Yorkshire Police in 1996 because she wanted to make a difference and is still as passionately committed to that goal now as she was then.

My proudest moment was when I was selected to become the Chief Constable’s Staff Officer.  The learning and development I gained from being around our most senior leaders during the 18 months I spent in this role was exponential and I can highly recommend being thrown out of your comfort zone as that is where true growth happens.

International Women’s Day is a fantastic opportunity to promote the many benefits of having diverse teams. The people are my favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police and it has  been both an honour and a privilege to work with some of the most amazing people I have ever met over the last 23 years.

Chief Inspector Rachel Wood (pictured) has said it’s been an honour and privilege to work with amazing people at North Yorkshire Police over the years

 

THIS IS A SERVICE POPULATED BY THOSE FOCUSSED ON THE SAFETY AND NEEDS OF OTHER

Claire Craven-Griffiths joined North Yorkshire Police in 1998 as Head of Planning and Performance, little knowing how significantly the service would speed up and change and what range and number of opportunities this would bring.

That said my immediate take on the culture has remained, this is a service populated by those focussed on the safety and needs of others, and that gives me a standard to meet every day.

I’ve been really fortunate to have been involved in all kinds of service developments including reaching out to staff and the public through surveys, making policing more transparent through new governance arrangements and working through the legislation to bring in Police and Crime Commissioners. I’ve had the chance to navigate some personally unchartered waters too by introducing the employee benefits scheme and North Yorkshire Police’s response to the Policing Code of Ethics, designing operational models such as the seven force solution for CBRN and Disaster Victim Identification services and overhauling the Chief Constable’s national portfolio of Citizens in Policing to regenerate the public’s interest in and contribution to keeping their communities safe.

My two favourite aspects of working here are the opportunities to support others and personal stretch. Before taking on the Chief of Staff secondment I thought I knew a little about policing. And I was right, I knew just a little! That secondment has given me a firmer grasp of wider policing and societal issues and just how vast and complex this landscape is. Wherever possible I have translated that for others’ understanding and achievement of their goals. I think that the International Women’s Day shows the policing service’s determination to learn and improve continuously.

Claire Craven-Griffiths (pictured) enjoys the opportunities that North Yorkshire Police brings to support others and navigate unchartered waters

 

IT’S ABOUT ENCOURAGING OTHERS TO DEVELOP THEIR SKILLS AND EXPERIENCES

Lucy McNeill is a Detective Inspector in the Investigation Hub at Scarborough for North Yorkshire Police.

I joined in 2003 because I wanted a job with a bit of excitement alongside helping others; I’d considered nursing but I’m not too keen on blood! My proudest moment was when I got promoted to Inspector in 2016. My favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is the variety of roles and being able to encourage others to develop their skills and experiences.

I think International Women’s Day is an excellent opportunity to celebrate how far society has come in recognising females in the work place.

Detective Inspector Lucy McNeill (pictured) had considered a career in nursing before joining policing in 2003.

 

IT’S ABOUT FINDING WAYS TO IMPROVE PEOPLE’S CHANCES IN LIFE

Sergeant Neil Northend has worked for North Yorkshire Police since 2005 and been a Sergeant for nearly 14 years.

I joined the police service over 20 years ago as I wanted to make a real difference to people’s lives. It is not always about the excitement of the job but finding ways to help, support and improve people’s chances in life.

Over the past few years I have been part of a small but really effective team of School Liaison officers across North Yorkshire and City of York. I am really proud of the work we do as we help make real changes for young people, with the help of young people – especially in the life choices they make.  We oversee a number of educational, volunteering and work experience programmes and work with a range of partners to provide early intervention, advice and support to schools, parents and young people; with the main focus being not to criminalise young people but to support and engage with them.

International Women’s Day is a reminder about how important equality is in the world regardless of your age, gender, race, religion, disability or sexual orientation. The work we do very much supports the issues that affect young women and those other young people with protected characteristics. I’m also proud to be one of the North Yorkshire Police’s members for supporting colleagues around ‘Gender’ and raising awareness of the issues that matter to them.

Sergeant Neil Northend (pictured) is proud of the work that his team do to help make real changes for young people and support the life choices they make.

 

WE’RE ON THAT JOURNEY AND COMMITTED TO MAKING THAT CHANGE

Deputy Chief Constable Phil Cain spent 13 years with the RAF before joining North Yorkshire Police in 2001. He joined policing because he has a passion for public service and wanted to serve his local communities.

I grew up in North Yorkshire, and I have spent my policing career in North Yorkshire, so this area means a great deal to me. One of things I am most proud of is being part of the dedicated team of staff and officers working tirelessly to increase the diversity across all roles within the force.

Since setting up our Positive Action Team in April 2017, we have increased female police officer representation by 5% and female PCSO representation by 13% in the last two years, with the gender split for PCSOs now being 52/48 female to male.  We are building on the success of our last recruitment campaign to further improve female representation, in addition to other protected characteristics, across the force. In fact, our latest senior police officer promotion boards has seen us achieve 50/50 gender split from Chief Constable through to Chief Inspector.  We have a high retention rate at North Yorkshire Police, so it takes time to change the diversity of the workforce – but we’re on that journey and committed to making that change.

International Women’s Day is an important day for us to recognise just how far we’ve come as a force over the last 75 years since our first female officer joined us.  But, it also serves as a reminder that we still have a long way to go to get everyone, whoever they are, to the same starting line so they can run a fair race. Until we can say that everyone has the same opportunities in policing I will keep fighting the battle for equality.

Deputy Chief Constable Phil Cain (pictured) has spent his policing career in North Yorkshire since joining in 2001

 

WHO RUNS THE WORLD…

Detective Constable Quita Passmore works in the Cleveland and North Yorkshire Major Investigation Team based at Harrogate.

I joined the Specials in 2004 and the regulars in 2006 because I wanted to make a difference and become Cracker! I am proud when I come across the people I have assisted through my work and their lives are heading in a positive direction as a result of my assistance. Second is when I became a Detective. My favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is the sense of family and the beautiful surroundings, oh and it’s where I met my partner. I think International Women’s Day is a brilliant way of letting young females know there are no limits! ‘Who runs the world …’

Detective Constable Quita Passmore (pictured) says that the sense of family is one of her favourite things about working for North Yorkshire Police

 

I WANTED TO GIVE SOMETHING BACK AFTER MY BROTHER DIED THROUGH MENTAL HEALTH

Catherine Dearden volunteers for the force as a Volunteer Area Co-Ordinator in Northallerton in addition to volunteering with the local Neighbourhood Policing team and Rural Taskforce at community events and Rural Watches.

I started volunteering for North Yorkshire Police in 2015 because I wanted to enhance my existing skills but also give something back to the police after my brother died suddenly through mental health. After the compassion and support I received from the police as his next kin I felt I wanted to do something to aid the work that the police do in our communities.

In my role I look after a number of volunteers and work with the local Neigbourhood Policing Team supporting their activities whether it’s at a cybercrime and fraud prevention event or supporting an event out in the community with partners. I really enjoy the variety that the role brings and I was recently presented with an ‘Exceptional Commitment’ High Sheriff of North Yorkshire Award in recognition of her great valuable services to the community whilst volunteering which I’d say is my proudest moment.

International Women’s Day is a great way to celebrate how as a woman I can be recognised as not only a mum or parent, but someone in my own right whether it’s through my day-to-day work as an Investigator outside of the police as well as my role for North Yorkshire Police.

Volunteer Area Co-Ordinator Catherine Dearden (pictured) was recently presented with an ‘Exceptional Commitment’ Award in recognition of her valuable services whilst volunteering

 

IT’S A HUGE OPPORTUNITY TO RECOGNISE THE ACHIEVEMENTS AND CONTRIBUTION OF WOMEN

Angie Smith works as Police Community Support Officer within the Northallerton Neighbourhood Policing Team. She joined in 2003 because she wanted to make a difference to the people whom I serve in my community.

My proudest moment was when I recently received an award for my commitment and compassion in dealing with the aftermath of two major criminal investigations involving a local school, as well as my ongoing work in keeping a young, vulnerable, female from becoming a victim of repeated CSE.

My favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is the people and colleagues that I work with and the relationships I have forged over the years with them, as well as the variety of work I become involved with.

International Women’s Day is a huge opportunity to recognise the achievements and contribution that women give within their roles and society. The day set aside should be a time to reflect this.

PCSO Angie Smith (pictured) was recently recognised for her commitment and compassion for her work in her local area

 

OUR AMAZING VOLUNTEERS PLAY SUCH A KEY ROLE IN LOCAL POLICING

Natasha Almond is North Yorkshire Police’s Citizens in Policing Coordinator Manager. She joined in 2016 because she wanted to help develop creative solutions to the changing face of crime through developing their volunteering programme.

My proudest moment was in 2018 when the amazing volunteers in our “Community Connector” project successfully worked with a vulnerable couple in our community who came to the attention of the police but did not need a policing service. The project is a befriending service designed to provide mentoring, support and a listening ear to people who are vulnerable, socially isolated or disadvantaged, to enable them to take control of their lives and make choices that will change their lives for the better. The volunteers supported them to develop confidence and new social networks; and due to this the couple have ceased contacting the police on a weekly basis and have increased health and well-being.

International Women’s Day is fantastic opportunity to celebrate the work women do across all disciplines and sectors, including our fantastic volunteers who play such a key role in supporting their local police teams and are a vital link with our communities.

Citizens in Policing Coordinator Manager Natasha Almond (pictured) said her proudest moment was when some of the force’s volunteers helped to change the lives of a vulnerable couple

 

IT WAS VERY HUMBLING TO HEAR WHAT A DIFFERENCE I HAD MADE

Sergeant Clare Crossan works as a Response Sergeant for North Yorkshire Police.

I joined in 2005 because I wanted to make my community safer by locking up crooks! My proudest moment was when I received a letter of thanks from a male who I had prevented taking his own life. It was very humbling to hear what a difference I had made to him and his family. My favourite thing about working for North Yorkshire Police is that every day is different and there’s always so much more to learn. I think International Women’s Day is a positive step in promoting gender equality.

Sergeant Clare Crossan’s (pictured) proudest moment was finding out what a difference she had made to a man and has family whom she had previously prevented from taking his life

 

THE GREAT THINGS WE DO CAN OFTEN BE FORGOTTEN ABOUT IN OUR BUSY DAY TO DAY LIVES

Maria Earles is Head of Organisation and Development for North Yorkshire Police.

I returned to North Yorkshire Police in 2012 because I wanted to work for an organisation that not only cares for the communities that it keeps safe but also cares for its people that deliver that important work day in day out.

I am always proud to represent North Yorkshire Police at local, regional and national events because we have so many good news stories to share about the great things we do and they can often be forgotten about in our busy day to day lives. Working for North Yorkshire Police provides a great variety of work and every day, I am dealing with someone and something different.

International Women’s Day is an important opportunity to promote gender equality, celebrate women’s achievements and recognise the progress that has been made by the brave women of the world.

Maria Earls, Head of Organisation and Development (pictured) is always proud to represent North Yorkshire Police

 

#IWD2019 #BalanceforBetter

Last modified: March 8, 2019