Home > What we do > Preventing and tackling crime > Anti-social behaviour > Anti-social behaviour, crime and policing act 2014

Anti-social behaviour, crime and policing act 2014

The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 is the law that guides what agencies can do about anti-social behaviour. Since the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 has been introduced, we have been tackling anti-social behaviour with agencies by using two different approaches.

Informal approach

  • Giving the offender a warning either verbally or in writing
  • Getting the offender to identify, acknowledge and try to resolve the causes of the behaviour (For example, does the offender only behave in a certain way when they have been drinking alcohol)
  • Offender to agree to an Acceptable Behaviour Contract – a voluntary agreement between the offender and appropriate organisations such as the police, local council or housing provider that commits the offender to abide by the terms of the contract until such time as the anti-social behaviour has diminished.

Formal approach

  • Police being able to force an individual or group away from an area for a period of time (no longer than 48hours) through the Dispersal Power to a court granting a Civil Injunction (from early 2015) or a Criminal Behaviour Failure to comply with either of these could result in a prison sentence for the offender and both the Injunction and Order can be granted for youths (aged over 10).
  • The local council will also be able to designate an area as having a Public Spaces Protection Order on. This will aim to stop the activities causing issues for local people and it could impose a Community Protection Notice on an individual over 16 years, a business or
  • Ultimately, as a last resort, the police or council could seek to close down a premises or piece of land through a court Closure Order for potentially up to 6 months.

For local involvement and accountability, the 2014 Act also includes two measures called Community Remedy and Community Trigger.